Watch How The Freezing Air Transforms This Bubble In Seconds – You’ll Want To Take It Home After

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Watch How The Freezing Air Transforms This Bubble In Seconds – You’ll Want To Take It Home After

Remember how fascinating blowing bubbles could be as a kid?

Do you remember chasing them as they made their way through the air before they eventually popped? As a kid, chasing bubbles was a fun and magical experience. You would chase the bubbles, try to catch them, or just try to pop as many as you could in one go.

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Source: YouTube Screenshot

A bubble can look so delicate and fragile to some but strong and resistant to others. But the latter does not happen very often. We see bubbles pop more often than we see them resist the evaporation of the soap film’s surface. When it does happen, and the bubble remains intact, it can leave us with an incredibly magical experience.

Gloria Allwin was able to witness the magic of sturdy soap bubbles and decided to record it on video.

Gloria doesn’t mind that blowing bubbles is considered to be an activity for children; she proves that this fun activity does not have an age limit!

Gloria blew a perfectly round bubble on a cold snowy winter day, and despite the weather conditions, the bubble didn’t pop. In the beginning, the little bubble looked like it was going to disappear in the cold winter air. Instead, it landed on a pile of snow and just stayed there, perfectly still.

As she sat back with surprise, something incredible happened.

As Gloria stared at the bubble with a tiny voice whispering, “don’t pop,” nature took over and did something no one was expecting. The bubble started to transform into an icy crystal ball.

The video of the snow globe freezing over was posted on YouTube, with the caption “Five degrees, little breeze and sunshine – a bubble can freeze in 1:27 min. Montana Fun!” It was posted in January 2017 and has already over 340,000 views!

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Source: YouTube Screenshot

The video is really interesting to watch, and it provides a good understanding of how this bubble goes from a liquid to a solid.

The outsides and insides of a bubble are made out of soap molecules, and a small layer of water can be found between two layers of those soap molecules. By working together, they hold the air of the bubble inside.

Usually, bubbles will pop if they are poked or if they happen to land on something sharp. Other than that, bubbles just pop once the water that is found between the soap film area has evaporated.

The reason why Gloria’s bubble was able to hold for so long is probably because the soap molecules tend to take longer to evaporate when it’s cold.

By blowing a bubble on a cold day with not too much wind, the bubble can freeze and last for a couple of minutes, just like Gloria’s bubble did.

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YouTube Screenshot

Source: YouTube Screenshot

If you want to try this experiment yourself by making your own soap bubbles, all you have to do is thoroughly mix a couple of cups of distilled water with one cup of liquid dish soap and a tablespoon of glycerin. You can go ahead and use it straight away or let it rest overnight for the perfect bubbles.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: Gloria Allwin, Kids Discover

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